“One Day on the Red Hills of Georgia”: The Effects of Immigration Status on Latino Migrants’ Experience of Discrimination, Utilization of Public Services, and Attitudes toward Acculturation

  • Mikhail Lyubansky Professor, Department of Psychology, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign
  • Paul A. Harris Professor, Department of Political Science, Auburn University
  • William E. Baker Professor, Department of Political Science, Kennesaw State University
  • Cameron D. Lippard Professor, Department of Sociology, Appalachian State University
Keywords: immigration, acculturation, immigration status, migration, Georgia, Mexican, Latino.

Abstract

This study documents the experiences and identities of undocumented Spanish-speaking migrants in Georgia vis-à-vis their counterparts who have legal status. Structured interviews were used to collect data from 127 adults (49 percent undocumented at their time of arrival and 38 percent undocumented at the time of data collection) regarding their experience of discrimination, utilization of services, identity preferences, mental health, and beliefs in five domains: vulnerability, injustice, distrust, superiority, and helplessness. Significant immigration status differences emerged for education, income, utilization of some city services, and a few of the belief scales. However, the documented and undocumented samples were more similar than different.
Published
2013-12-19
How to Cite
Lyubansky, M., Harris, P., Baker, W., & Lippard, C. (2013). “One Day on the Red Hills of Georgia”: The Effects of Immigration Status on Latino Migrants’ Experience of Discrimination, Utilization of Public Services, and Attitudes toward Acculturation. Norteamérica, Revista Académica Del CISAN-UNAM, 8(3). https://doi.org/10.20999/nam.2013.c004
Section
CONTEMPORARY ISSUES